AN ONGOING NEWSLETTER December 2008


The Old Barn
by Gisby

The Barn started life as a slot-together die-cut wooden kit from a dollar store.

Truth be told, it wasn't completely awful straight from the bag: Pretty awful, yes, but readily salvageable. The scale was good, and it was realistic in design.

The parts were laid out on two 8.5 x 11 in sheets of sort-of-warpy plywood.

Before I removed the pieces from the sheet, I glued & filled all the locating slots and the door on one end. When they were solid, I removed the pieces.

I then cut away the locating lugs, the strip at the bottom of the open door, the porch & roof supports, and cut a door opening into the closed end. This left me with the parts below (in yellow).

I could (should?) have left large doors at both ends, to make it easier to drive wagons through. But I didn't.

The walls were then sanded smooth, and boards were scribed into them.

The windows and doors were framed with craft wood, and doors were made from plastic strips and hung as per "How To Hang A Door"

The (removable) roof is made from larger craft sticks laid in place and glued together. Once the glue dried, a strip of cloth was glued inside to reinforce the joins, and locator stops added so the roof sits in place.

The new porch has a floor made fron craft sticks, scored to represent double boards, The supports are pieces of chopstick, and the roof is again, larger craft sticks. The porch roof is fixed in place.

The work table is made from craft wood, and the barrel is a turned wooden craft item.

Coils of wire and a metal wagon wheel are used to add detail to the end walls, and a bit of foam greenery grows here and there against building.

The supports for the hayloft were cut from the square end of the chopsticks used earlier.

The loft itself was made from the kit roof sections: After all, they were free and already had boards scored into them. (I had primed them for another project: they were eventually sanded and stained)

Signs were printed
on my computer and glued in place. (The LIVERY sign was copied from an Old West original)

All in all, it was a fun and satisfying project.

I like the look pf the building, and I think I made good use of my dollar-store treasure.


COWTOWN CHRONICLE

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